Pictures With Churches

 

The pictures with Evangelical churches started from the E. Orthodox Reformation which you are about to see, are just a sample of the many churches of that denomination spread throughout Southeastern Romania.

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Tudor Popescu the priest, before the Reformation

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Present-day view of the Eastern Orthodox Church “The Stork Nest” where he served as a priest

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Tudor Popescu in his 70s, decades after he started the reformation . He became an Evangelical minister and founder of the Eastern Orthodox Reformation in Romania. It should be noticed that he did not intend to dissent, but his exclusion from the Eastern Orthodox Church of Romania led to the reformation within Eastern Orthodoxy.

 

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Emil Constantinescu was the most trusted partner in ministry of Tudor Popescu. His story is not part of the essay yet, but it will be sometime in the future. Emil Constantinescu was born in Pucioasa, a beautiful, small town surrounded by hills in Dambovita county, southern Romania. His father was a priest. Emil was expected to become a priest as well, but he chose to major in classical languages. At the preaching of Tudor Popescu, he recieved the Lord. As a result, Emil’s father disowned him. Serban Constantinescu, Emil’s son, was one of the main ministers in the denomination later on.

Imn crestin cu versuri de Emil Constantinescu

Când drumul meu e-ntunecos

Când drumul meu e-ntunecos,

Lumina mea este Christos:

Cu El, stråbat calea voios.

Ce bun e El!

Când e furtunå-n jurul meu

Si ceru-i tot doar un nor greu,

Isus e påzitorul meu.

Ce bun e El!

Când sunt departe de cåmin

Si totu-n jur îmi e stråin,

Al meu dor prin Isus mi-alin.

Ce bune e El!

Când suflå recea-l mortii vânt,

Si pierd comori de pe påmânt,

Isus råmâne orisicând,

Ce bun e El.

Si ieri, si azi, si-n viitor

E-acelas scump Mâmtuitor:

Mereu îmi vine-n ajutor.

Ce bun e El

Transcris: Serban Constantinescu

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The headquarters building and sanctuary of the Eastern Orthodox Reformed Church where Tudor Popescu lived and preached. The official name of the church is “The Romanian Evangelical Church”. It is located in Bucharest on 48 Carol Davila Street.  The building was constructed specifically for the new movement with funds mainly from Miss Ghica, a devoted Christian young lady who also was very rich.

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Midweek service at the Carol Davila location of the Romanian Evangelical Church.

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Tudor Popescu traveled around the country and planted key Evangelical churches, among which is the Romanian Evangelical Church in Micesti a village in Arges county, southern Romania.

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The Romanian Evangelical Church in Rucar, one of the most beautiful mountain villages of Romania, part of the Arges county.

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Side view of the church in Rucar.

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The interior of the church in Rucar.  

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The Romanian Evangelical Church in Ploiesti, an important city in southern Romania.

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The interior of the church in Ploiesti. The believers here have great esthetic taste.

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The Romanian Evangelical Church in Baleni, an agricultural village in Dambovita county, southern Romania. Most of the congregation is composed of Bulgarians who migrated to Romania centuries ago. Today, they speak both Romanian and Bulgarian.

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The interior of the church in Baleni.

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The Romanian Evangelical Church in Urziceni, county of Ialomita.

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Another Romanian Evangelical Church on Colorian Street, Bucharest.

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A service at the church on Colorian Street.

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The Romanian Evangelical Church in Darasti, county of Ilfov.

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The Romanian Evangelical Church in the village of Faget, county of Arges.

Pictures with churches taken from Inventiv Proiect from Romania posted on Picasa.  

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Responses

  1. “…his exclusion from the Eastern Orthodox Church of Romania led to the reformation within Eastern Orthodoxy.”

    Do you have any idea how this sounds? “Being an outsider allowed him to do insider work.” Yes, brilliant stuff there.


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